Supreme Court to Hear Streaming TV Over the Internet Case

Comments Off on Supreme Court to Hear Streaming TV Over the Internet Case Written by on February 3, 2014 | Posted in Content Licensing, Copyright Infringement, IP Licensing Litigation

Print this postLike many cable and satellite TV consumers these days, I have been closely following the new options on the market for streaming TV service and hoping that the day will soon come when I can significantly reduce my monthly subscription costs without cutting off my access to live TV.   With the cost […]

Google Announces Controversial Decision to Factor Receipt of DMCA Notices into Ranking of Websites

Comments Off on Google Announces Controversial Decision to Factor Receipt of DMCA Notices into Ranking of Websites Written by on August 15, 2012 | Posted in Content Licensing, Copyright Infringement

Print this postGoogle has just made a controversial announcement that it will now be factoring the number of “valid” DMCA notices that it receives on a particular website into how it ranks that website in its search results. The Wall Street Journal reported: Google’s move comes as Google itself is attempting to become a major […]

PayPal Launches New Internet Controversy over Decision to Censor Erotica Content Sold through Platform

Comments Off on PayPal Launches New Internet Controversy over Decision to Censor Erotica Content Sold through Platform Written by on February 27, 2012 | Posted in Content Licensing, IP Licensing Deals, IP Transactions

Print this postPayPal has set off a new controversy on the Internet by advising e-book sellers that they must remove all erotica content off their websites or PayPal will stop doing business with them.   In particular, PayPal is apparently concerned with content dealing with erotica fiction containing rape, incest, and bestiality, reported Technolog on MSNBC’s […]

Electronic Frontier Foundation Launches New Site to Track Modifications to Online Terms and Conditions

Comments Off on Electronic Frontier Foundation Launches New Site to Track Modifications to Online Terms and Conditions Written by on June 8, 2009 | Posted in Content Licensing, Internet Transactions

Print this postThe Electronic Frontier Foundation (“EFF”) has just launched a new website to track companies’ modifications to their terms and conditions: TOSback.org. According to an explanation on the website, TOSbackup.org was launched with the intention of increasing public awareness about online terms of service, and to help the public monitor changes to the terms […]

Associated Press Interview Offers Some Insight on its Plans to Police Blogosphere

Comments Off on Associated Press Interview Offers Some Insight on its Plans to Police Blogosphere Written by on June 4, 2009 | Posted in Content Licensing, Copyright Infringement, IP Licensing News

Print this postAs the Silicon Valley IP Licensing Blog has been reporting, the Associated Press has already initiated an effort to impose its view of what constitutes fair use on the blogosphere. However, I came across today an interesting interview by Ars Technica, which offers some insight on how the Associated Press plans to go […]

Blogosphere Reacts to Licensing Terms for Amazon’s New Kindle Publishing for Blogs

Comments Off on Blogosphere Reacts to Licensing Terms for Amazon’s New Kindle Publishing for Blogs Written by on May 26, 2009 | Posted in Commercialization of Intellectual Property, Content Licensing, Copyright Infringement, IP Licensing News

Print this postAmazon has just released the beta of its new Kindle Publishing for Blogs, and the blogosphere is starting to react to Amazon’s new licensing terms in its terms and conditions. What are bloggers saying? Well, the early consensus seems to be that while the concept of blog content licensing to Kindle is good, […]

Collaborating Can Create Legal Headaches if the Appropriate IP Agreements Are Not in Place

Print this postIf you run a small business, you have probably given some thought over this recession to how you might be able to collaborate with other businesses to generate some additional revenue for your business. I know that this is definitely something that I have been thinking about for my practice, and it is […]

Facebook Adopts Townhall Format to Allow Users to Comment and Vote on New Statement of Rights and Responsibilities

Comments Off on Facebook Adopts Townhall Format to Allow Users to Comment and Vote on New Statement of Rights and Responsibilities Written by on March 2, 2009 | Posted in Content Licensing

Print this postReversing its course again for the third time in less than a month, Facebook has proposed another new set of terms and conditions and is adopting a townhall format to allow users to comment and even vote on the new changes. CEO Mark Zuckerburg explained the new changes at the Facebook Blog as […]

Facebook Reverses Decision and Announces Temporary Return to Prior Terms and Conditions

Comments Off on Facebook Reverses Decision and Announces Temporary Return to Prior Terms and Conditions Written by on February 18, 2009 | Posted in Content Licensing

Print this postFollowing up on our blog posting yesterday regarding the recent controversy over a Facebook decision to amend its terms and conditions, Facebook has decided to reverse its previous decision and temporarily adopt its previous terms and conditions. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the change of policy late last night, stating as follows: Many […]

Facebook Licensing Controversy Prompts Public to Take Closer Look at Social Networking Site Terms and Conditions

4 Comments Written by on February 17, 2009 | Posted in Content Licensing

Print this postFollowing on the heels of a 2007 controversy over its privacy and advertising policies, Facebook has now set off a new controversy on the web with its decision to amend its terms and conditions, which deal with the licensing of content posted to its site. The provision at the heart of this controversy states as follows: You are solely […]

Should the Blogosphere Adopt the Creative Commons Licensing Model?

1 Comments Written by on November 12, 2008 | Posted in Content Licensing, Software Licensing

Print this postA posting by Kevin Smith on the Scholarly Communications @ Duke Blog explores the argument that the academic world should consider adopting the Creative Commons Licensing system for their academic works. The article got me to thinking: should the blogosphere consider adopting the same model? Smith’s argument is that the problem with the […]

Cutting Legal Costs by Investing in Good Templates

Print this postIn a recent blogpost, AdamsDrafting suggested that the recession should prompt companies to look at overhauling their contract template process. AdamsDrafting wrote: [A] recession should provide a greater incentive for a company to do something about the considerable amounts of time and money that it’s wasting due to its mediocre templates and primitive […]

Blog Content Licensing: Is there a market for it?

Print this postPlagiarismToday raised an interesting question today when it asked if blog content licensing was dead. I have given several presentations on blog law issues now, but I must say that I had never really given thought to the issue of whether or not there was really a market for blog content licensing–beyond, of […]

Blogosphere Reacts to Associated Press Assault on Fair Use Doctrine

Print this postShould the Associated Press have the right to set its own standards as to how much quoting from an Associated Press article constitutes fair use and how much requires the payment of a royalty? The Associated Press (“A.P.”) apparently thinks so, based on recent coverage of its plans to adopt blogging guidelines for […]

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